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Going Outside the “Comfort Zone”- a snapshot of GEMx post-elective experiences

Filed under: From GEMx Staff

Carol Russo
Post by Carol Russo, GEMx Senior Coordinator

Working for a program that offers access to international medical exchanges provides a reminder of how engaging in new situations, environments and systems not only provides alternate perspectives but affords opportunities of self discovery.

While I personally had an international exchange experience while a student in college, it was not a medical elective exchange. This was in the days of the internet’s infancy and my university’s study abroad office still housed all of its exchange opportunities in 500 page binders categorized by geographical regions. I ultimately chose and was accepted to a multicourse exchange in Siena, Italy.  I easily recall those initial moments while on my exchange where I felt overwhelmed by something as simple as deciphering a campus bus schedule or my inability to procure correct currency for basic purchases. However, I also carry with me that by self realizing my  weaknesses could provide opportunities for me to self-adapt and grow as a person in the larger human world.

GEMx has always been interested in hearing how students perceive their exchanges upon their returns and I would like to share some of these reflections with you as they demonstrate the profound and personal takeaways when  one allows to be challenged by immersion in a different culture and place.

“The first lesson in this experience I had, was to break the language barrier that were between the patients and me, I think was the most difficult task, because they where used to consult local doctors, and as I started to interact, it was not that easy. Over and over, you start to learn how to approach people and pathologies. The country I visited is also in ways to develop as mine, but smaller. So I could compare and [analyze] how they solve their health problems and social problems, I visited a lot of Tibetan and classic medicine centers, in which I talked with the local healers and communicate and learn about their most [common diseases] and how the manage them. “

“I feel that I am more confident. Having the opportunity to see how is it out there makes me a better person and a person who is able to try and attempt in thinking outside of the box for the betterment of all. Also, I began to appreciate more on what is here for me and the society in my country. One of the most striking aspect was the fact that junior doctors there in Indonesia including post graduate specialist trainees in Indonesian Hospitals are actually not paid any salary or wages. Despite of these difficulties they are still very much comfortable and striving their ways in their career on how they could benefit the society.”

“The only difficulty and disappointment that one would initially have would be that the medical system is in Hebrew. But, it is worth an experience to overcome this challenge by finding new friends who could help you. At the end, you will agree that language barrier is never an hindrance for you to learn but rather it opens a new path to build good and long standing relationships.”

“Many times when I was there, I felt so left behind and far off from the standard they live up to. Being surrounded in a mentally challenging environment can push you to be better, but it can also be draining and make you feel very small. It took me quite some time to regain myself and admit that Im inadequate. Once I embraced the fact, I started asking questions when I dont understand, participated in discussions, and soon enough I realized I’m learning a lot more. I was touched that the professors, senior residents, and interns I work with were very helpful once I open[ed] up.”

Oftentimes, experiencing the unfamiliar can carry more portents in shaping who and how we are in the future; it is up to the individual to discover how being vulnerable can deliver the most lasting lessons.

Student Exchange From MOSC Medical College (India) to Penang Medical College (Malaysia) by Prannoy Paul

Filed under: GEMx Student Reflections

Post by Prannoy Paul, Medical Student at Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church Medical College (India) who completed a GEMx Elective at Penang Medical College (Malaysia)

Our institution, Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church Medical College, Kolenchery, Kerala, India, has always encouraged students to get more exposure in medicine by attending various medical competitions and medical student conferences happening around the world. It was in December 2016, that the GEMx coordinator of our institution, Dr. Anna Mathew informed me that I and my friend Kiron are selected for the GEMx student elective for the year of 2017 from our institution. I was really excited hearing the news, but I was also uncertain about how it is going to be or where should I be going.

Photo of MOSC Students at Airport

At the airport

While we were discussing about which institution to apply for the elective, it so happened that the GEMx representative from USA, Mr. Justin Seeling visited our institution for the promotion of GEMx. We had an opportunity to talk with him and he recommended that Penang medical College, Malaysia would be a good choice for us. So we contacted Penang Medical college, sent all the documents required and we got approved for the elective in the department of Surgery for the month of May, 2017.

Photo of Penang Medical College Taken by MOSC Students

Penang Medical College (PMC) is a private, Malaysian campus owned by two world-renowned medical universities in Ireland, the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and the University
College Dublin (UCD). PMC is affiliated to the Penang General Hospital, also known as Hospital Pulau Pinang, which is very near the medical college campus. Being the largest public hospital in Penang with 1090 beds, Penang general hospital is always busy with patients.

Photo of MOSC Students with Professors of Surgery and Medicine

With Professors of Surgery and Medicine

On our first day at PMC, we were introduced to Penang Medical College and Penang General Hospital by the administrative officer at PMC, Ms. Masitah Sihabudeen and we got an orientation session about the college. Our supervisor for the elective was Dr. Premnath, the head of Department for Surgery at PMC. We were grouped along with the final year students there at PMC.

Photo of MOSC Students with With Surgery Unit C2 at Penang Medical College

With Surgery Unit C2

In the mornings, we had to go to the wards to clerk the patients and take cases. Patients spoke mainly Malay, Chinese and English. For the patients who spoke Malay and Chinese, we were provided with translators to help with our communication. The students there were also very helpful in our communication with the patients. I was able to see and understand many diseases that are not very common here. We discussed often about the variety of diseases and surgical conditions that present to the hospital, and how it was different in India.

In the afternoons, we had various sessions like seminars, tutorials, case presentations etc. Professors and students ensured that I actively participate in those sessions and asked me to explain how various procedures were done in my country and how it was different from that being done in Malaysia. Those sessions were filled with lots of fun along with gaining new knowledge .Our classes in the mornings would begin as early as 7 am on some days and the afternoon classes typically lasts till 5pm. Saturdays and Sundays were holidays. Apart from that, there are also many local holidays every month in Penang due to the rich cultural heritage of the city. Throughout the elective, our supervisors and student representatives were always in touch with us to know if they can help us with anything.

Photo of MOSC Students with the GEMx Student Ambassadors at Penang Medical College

With GEMx Student Ambassadors of PMC

The GEMx student ambassadors at PMC were Syafaf Humaira Aman and Yik Chin Low. They were very helpful to us throughout our stay in Penang. They helped us with our academic doubts, took us to the major tourist destinations and also helped us try out some local cuisine in Malaysia.

Malaysia is a favorite tourist destination for tourists all over the world. On holidays, we were able to visit some of the major tourist destinations in Penang. Our friends at PMC and even the professors suggested good places to visit for the holidays. Penang is also very famous for the food. It is called the food heaven of Malaysia. The varieties of foods include Malay, Chinese and Indian cuisine. Penang is also very famous for its very delicious but cheap street food which is a very important attraction for the tourists visiting Penang.

Photo of Transportation in Malaysia

The population in Malaysia is mainly Malay, with others being Malaysian Chinese, Malaysian Indians, and other indigenous people. Islam is the state religion while many other religions like Buddhism, Hinduism and Christianity are also common. Languages spoken include Malay, which is the official language, English, and Tamil.

As most people, especially the younger generation spoke English very well, communication was not a problem for us while in Malaysia. People were very friendly and helpful. If we asked someone for the way to a place, they would eagerly tell us in detail. The hospitality of the Malaysian people made our stay, a very comfortable and enjoyable experience.

Photo of Malaysian Cuisine

Char Keoy Teow

The elective to Penang Medical College in Malaysia was a wonderful experience for me. It helped me understand how the health systems and medical education work in Malaysia and  how to interact with patients, medical students, and professors from another country. I also learned and understood the differences in medical conditions and health care in another country and achieved a broader, a global perspective in medicine. I recommend more students make use of the fantastic student exchange program provided by GEMx, it is very easy to apply to, and we are supervised in each step of the elective. The elective improves our academic knowledge, our communication skills, confidence, and our very perspective about medicine and about the world.

GEMx Elective Reflections – Student Exchange from Penang Medical College, Malaysia to University of Gadjah Mada, Indonesia

Filed under: GEMx Student Reflections

Post by Thaneswaran Jeyakrishnan, Medical Student at Penang Medical College (Malaysia) who completed a GEMx Elective at Gadjah Mada University (Indonesia)

Student Exchange from Penang Medical College, Malaysia to University of Gadjah Mada, Indonesia
I have now completed an elective course of 4 weeks in a tertiary hospital named RS Dr. Sardijito in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The course comprises of 2 weeks of being in surgical rotation and 2 weeks in Orthopedics. I have chosen this place via the GEMx School Partnership program that was offered in my home institution (Penang Medical College, Georgetown, Malaysia). After being selected by my institution I was offered a range of options to carry out electives, all of which were listed in the website in terms of the GEMx Partner Schools and the courses they offered. I chose Indonesia mainly because of its expanding expertise in medicine and surgery in the expense of a low-resource setting especially with the burden from the rural areas and the ever growing population. RS Sardijito is a university hospital, attached to a reputable Indonesian public university called University of Gajah Mada. My time was entirely spent in the hospital and I was able to use the university facilities such as the library which was situated in close proximity to the hospital.

Thaneswaran Jeyakrishnan
Initially before embarking the elective, I was brought on an orientation to visit the facilities in Sardijito Hospital. The students from the university there was very welcoming regarding my visit. On the first day of my rotation, I introduced myself to the supervisor whom was the person-in-charge for me and he gave me a brief outline of the possible activities that I could benefit during the rotation. I was then placed in a group of residents who are doing their postgraduate course and for most of the times I was in this team of doctors whom I have been tagging along. The beautiful aspect of work in this hospital is that everything that is done here was more of team-work whereby the residents would help each other out and together they divide their tasks besides updating each other about their patients’ condition. I find this method very efficacious not only theoretically in preventing overworked atmosphere but it is healthy in many ways in maintaining the best patient care. Moreover, the residents working as a team teach and guide each other at all times. My routine usually starts as early as 6 am when the residents would do their patient-visiting and review their cases. At around 7.30 am in the morning report presentation would take place where the residents would present their cases in PowerPoint slides to the panel of specialists and consultants. There would be exchange of questions and queries which were all beneficial in the point of view of learning. I learned about the importance of a good presentation skill which comes with practice. I understand that only through discussion and reflection that one would be a better doctor. After this, I would usually go to either the operating theater or the outpatient clinic.

Thaneswaran Jeyakrishnan photo 2
The residents here in Indonesia have all been so welcoming, friendly and helpful. Something to be highlighted here is the way they handle patients- besides being friendly and caring, they show enormous amount of empathy towards their patients via body language, verbal and actions all of which are explicitly patient-centered. Perhaps it is the culture of politeness here that has shaped these doctors to be very empathic but I can assure that these values came-forward so often here not only in just the patient-doctor setting but even in my everyday lives in Indonesia. Since my stay here I realize that the locals are very helpful and friendly in which there were many situations when the locals tend to offer helping hands even though if you don’t ask for one. There are lots of ‘sorry’ and ‘thank yous’ going around in their own way of language expressions and sign. I believe that these are something that should be modelled everywhere else too. In terms of the patient care, the social aspects are always taken into serious consideration especially in terms of patient’s access and transport to hospital, finance and support from the family. Whilst this is how it should be anywhere globally, nevertheless there are many circumstances when doctors somehow omit these aspects of care when there is overcrowding and overwhelming stress especially in developing countries with low-resource settings. This is one of my salient learning point during my elective course in Indonesia which is to pay attention on how patient is going to recover in a long-term. During the course here, the senior residents here were very encouraging and they have provided adequate guidance for me.

 

 

GEMx Staff Post: Introducing Angel Roman, GEMx Coordinator

Filed under: From GEMx Staff

Angel Roman
Post by Angel Roman, GEMx Coordinator 

Hello everyone!  My name is Angel Roman and I am the newest member to the GEMx Staff. I joined ECFMG in 2010 as a member of the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) at ECFMG. My time in ERAS expanded my knowledge of the process for which International Medical Graduates undergo to enter into U.S Graduate Medical Education (GME). The principal reason of why I joined GEMx was to renew my working relationship with past ERAS employees, Justin Seeling (GEMx Program Manager) and Carol Russo (GEMx Senior Coordinator).

 motorcycles
At the forefront of my decision however, was  gaining a broader understanding of global health education systems and how cross cultural awareness could serve to develop a better understanding of some diseases. In my new role as GEMx Coordinator, I will serve as the point of contact for new institutions by assisting with the onboarding process as partners in GEMx global and regional network exchanges.

I was born and raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and returned after attending college in North Carolina. The transition between living in a large city such as Philadelphia and attending school at a small campus located in the Outer Banks of North Carolina was indeed a culture shock. I am certain that any student who has had the opportunity to participate in an elective abroad has experienced varying degrees of “culture shock”. One key difference between Philadelphia and my college campus is the closing times for local businesses. In Philadelphia the closing times vary from 10pm -2am, however on my small Southern campus, all but one store closed at 9pm. Returning home after college granted me well needed time to spend with family and friends (and convenient shopping times!)

dog
My passion for mechanics and the love for speed developed from my bond with my father who taught me everything there is to know about how to both race and fix cars and motorcycles. I have recently completed a restoration of my father’s old school Harley Davidson. Most of my free time is spent exploring the ever growing food scene in Philadelphia with my wife Richmary and dog Ace.

I am excited about joining the GEMx team and look forward to hopefully meeting some of you in person.  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me by email at aroman@ecfmg.org.

 

GEMx Staff Post: Working the Faculty of Medicine-University of Tunis El Manar at The Network: Towards Unity for Health Conference 2017

Filed under: From GEMx Staff

Post by Carol Russo, GEMx Senior Coordinator and International Conference Organizing Committee Member for of The Network: Towards Unity for Health (TUFH) Conference

“It is Amine, not Imen [Madame!]”

This patient student could no longer politely bear the indignity of my grievous and ever constant misspelling his name.  I had been chatting back and forth with him via WhatsApp to manage and direct his assigned fellow student volunteers for The Network: Towards Unity for Health/World Summit on Social Accountability Conference. Each year I volunteer to assist  the Conference organizers in planning and provide on-site support. One of the most enjoyable aspects of my on-site role is having the opportunity to interact and work with the students. This year the conference was held in Hammamet, Tunisia; and the host institution was the Faculty of Medicine-University of Tunis El Manar.

Students from University of Tunis El Manar Faculty of Medicine volunteered at the 2017 The Network: TUFH Conference

Nearly 50 students from University of Tunis El Manar Faculty of Medicine volunteered at the 2017 The Network: TUFH Conference. Pictured here is the group responsible for preparing the delegate bags on the eve of the Pre-Conference. The students specially designed these bags to include traditional Tunisian weaving on their reverse sides (complete with camel silhouettes!) and also thoughtfully included unique Tunisian souvenirs for the attendees.

Led by their dean, Dr. Ahmed Maherzi, these students served as translators, hosts, session assistants, registration and badging clerks, scientific poster hangers, airport greeters and cultural ambassadors for the roughly 500 delegates who attended. Throughout the 4 days of Pre-Conference and Main Conference events, their dedication, humor, spirit, cleverness, energy, cordiality and tenacity were constant and present to the delegates, fellow international medical and healthcare profession students, global health stakeholders and their guests. The students were integral to delivering an experience filled with all the valuable take-aways this conference traditionally offers. 

By the way, come to find out,  “Imen” is a common Tunisian girls’ name.

Amine, again, my apologies… I don’t know how we could have had such a successful conference without your assistance, your fellow students’ commitment … and your forgiving nature!

 

GEMx Sponsored Competition Reflection: Monesh Rao, International Quiz for Medical Undergraduates (IQMU) 2017

Filed under: GEMx Sponsored Events

Moneshwar Rao, 3rd Year Medical Student at Kasturba Medical College
Post by Moneshwar Rao, 3rd Year Medical Student at Kasturba Medical College – Manipal (India), and Head of the IQMU E-mail and Correspondence Committee

Specialty of Interest – Emergency Medicine, Orthopaedics, Surgery.  Would love to be involved in Medecins Sans Frontieres

How did you get involved with the IQMU event?

I auditioned for the post of Head of Email and Correspondence Committee

What was your role during the event?

Corresponding over email and phone calls to get colleges to be interested in participation in the quiz, Correspondence with quiz masters, advisors, and GEMx representatives. Corresponding with teams and members

Can you speak about the exchange of knowledge, both medical and cultural, that took place during the event?

A quiz event is a great means of sharing of knowledge and incorporates friendly competition which is essential in building professional partnerships. Including cultural performances in an existing quiz event adds a mix of cultural knowledge about the rich heritage of the country and promoting lifelong interaction among all participants. We are proud to say that IQMU has achieved this at long last and we hope that we can build it far better in the coming years.

Did you learn anything about GEMx and global exchanges, or ECFMG after the opening presentation and presence at the event?

GEMx played a key role in explaining the importance of academic exchange programmes to all the students present and that GEMx provides great opportunities to interested students.

Do you have any more comments or things that you’d like to mention about IQMU and its aim to grow globally?

IQMU has just begun and our aim is to steadily build a platform for the exchange of culture and heritage between students of all countries. Unity in diversity among all medical students around the globe is what we hope to strengthen in the coming years.

For more information about the IQMU event, please visit http://www.theiqmu.com/ and follow their Facebook page.

GEMx Elective Reflections – Student Exchange from Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia to University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

Filed under: GEMx Student Reflections

Post by Navilah Hidayati, Medical Student at Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia) who completed a GEMx Elective in Elective in General Surgery at the University of Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

Navilah Hidayati, Medical Student at Universitas Gadjah Mada
What have you gained from this exchange experience offered through GEMx?  What were the benefits?

I gained many unforgettable experiences, global connections, and lovely friends from this exchange experience. I met a lot of people in the hospital and learn about the international hospital dynamic there. I observed the medical students activity in the University and learn some good habits they have. I visited the beautiful tourism in Dubai and Sharjah. I tasted the traditional food, which has a very unique and strong flavor. I also had the chance to learn some Arabic language and enjoy their culture.

How did you prepare for your elective exchange? Were you prepared?

To be honest, I was not sure that I will be able to go for this exchange. I had some trouble with my post-acceptance documents. The problem became more complicated because I couldn’t contact the representative in the host university.

Fortunately, GEMx staffs also helped me to get in touch with her. About 2 weeks before my departure I received my acceptance letter. Ten days later, they sent me my visa. My parent bought my airplane ticket two days before the elective started and I was able to go to Sharjah to do my elective training. Only when I sat in the airplane that I thought,

“Ah, so I am going to do this..”

What did you learn from this experience both personally and professionally?  (consider your clinical experience, community experience, cultural experience, communications and interactions with faculty, staff, peers, and patient population)

Truthfully, I didn’t get many chances to improve my clinical skills in my host university. I had some trouble with the placement in the university hospital. I was glad that my supervisor, Ms. Eman and Prof. Nabil, take care of the problems quickly and I can start my elective training on the second week. I had one week in Pediatric, one week in Internal Medicine, and one week in Surgery. This actually different from what was written in my acceptance letter. I supposed to go to the General Surgery department for four weeks. I need to adapt every week in the different department. I also went to two different hospitals that have different regulations. Because of it, I barely had the chance to perform clinical skills on patients. But thankfully, the doctors were so active and always told me about the patient conditions. They also like to discussed some cases, which enhanced my clinical reasoning skills. The patients in the hospital was mostly Arabic, so sometimes I had trouble communication because I didn’t understand their language. When I faced this problem, my friends and the doctors helped me out. The staff in the hospital also very kind to me. Most of the nurses came from outside the UAE so they understand English. We sometimes had a chat on break time.

Apart from that, I had a beautiful experience with the University of Sharjah, the people living in the UAE, and their genuine Arabic culture.

How did you feel when you returned to your home school?

The first thing that came to my mind was I cannot believe it is already over. Everything ends so quickly. On my last day in Sharjah I had a very busy schedule. I need to take care of documents before leaving for my home town. Time flew so fast I didn’t realize it was already evening and I had to say good bye quickly to my dorm-mate.

The next day, I arrived in Indonesia. I had a short five days break before come back to my home school and do my clinical rotation. It felt so weird that time. It  seemed like my heart is left in my host school.

Can you share your story on this experience and how it has impacted you?  Were there any unexpected outcomes that you would like to share?

This experience is one of the most unexpected experiences I have ever had. I didn’t have the chance to see a lot of procedure that I think I will, but to tell the truth I gained so much more than that. I learn to deal with people (the patient, the hospital and university staff, my colleague). I learn to adapt with any given situation. I learn to understand every perspective. I learn to solve my problem independently. I learn to be brave, honest, patient, and wise. When I came back to Indonesia a lot of people said that it such a pity that the elective didn’t go as I expected it to be, but I don’t think so.

I am happy with my experience and it teaches me beyond the procedural thing. (more…)

GEMx Elective Reflections – Student Exchange from Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) (Mexico) to American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

Filed under: GEMx Student Reflections

Post by Latife Salame Khouri, Medical Student at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) (Mexico) who completed a GEMx Elective in Family Medicine at American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

What have you gained from this exchange experience offered through GEMx?  What were the benefits?

The benefits are both academic and personal. I gained a broader view of how Medicine can be practiced. I gained responsibility and maturity for living alone for a month in a different country than mine. I gained contacts in Medicine and friends for life. GEMx gave me the opportunity to be part of one of the best Medicine Schools in the Middle East.

How did you prepare for your elective exchange?  Were you prepared?

I prepared through life for my elective exchange. I didn’t get through a special preparation for it. Before my elective I already knew the languages I needed to go to the country I chose. I went to a multicultural school so I was used to be immersed in a culture different than mine. Academically, I felt that I was well prepared to learn and work in my elective.

What did you learn from this experience both personally and professionally? 

GEMx is a great opportunity to know how Medicine is done in countries with different cultures. I am from Mexico and I did the exchange in Lebanon. I practiced Medicine in arabic and english which was a great intellectual exercise. I learned a different anthropological approach to diseases. I learned to live in a city different than mine. I also met a type of public health system and I was able to compare between Mexico’s and Lebanon’s system.

How did you feel when you returned to your home school?

I felt satisfied because I represented well my home school in another country. I realised that my home school gave me the tools to practice good Medicine all around the world. I felt happy because I met great people in AUB and I kept in touch with them. I was very proud of my home school for being part of this project.

How is this learning relevant to you now that you are back?  Can you give any examples?  Will you do anything differently now?

My elective was in the department of Family Medicine of AUB. Lebanon and Mexico are similar in the lack of a strong primary care system, but the department of Family Medicine of AUB actually does a great job in primary care. I learned from my elective exchange that good primary care is possible in the health system of my country and I hope to make a difference there.

(more…)

GEMx Elective Reflections – Student Exchange from Malankara Orthodox Syrian College (MOSC), India to Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

Filed under: GEMx Student Reflections

Post by Anjali Anna Thomas, Medical Student at Malankara Orthodox Syrian College (MOSC) (India) who completed a GEMx Elective in Internal Medicine at Ben-Gurion University (Israel)

Anjali Anna Thomas, Medical Student at Malankara Orthodox Syrian College

What have you gained from this exchange experience offered through GEMx?  What were the benefits?

This experience has opened up a new perspective in medicine and medical education. It has helped me to understand the different kinds of health systems that are present in the world. International relations is another added benefit that I have gained through this opportunity. I was able to learn more about the life of people in a different country and gain an understanding on the various aspects like culture, language, religion, health systems and so on.

How did you prepare for your elective exchange?    Were you prepared?

I did not really do a lot of preparation for the elective. I got all the official paper works done and booked my tickets. But I think I could have learnt the language a little bit so that communication would have been much easier. The languages spoken in Israel are Hebrew and Arabic.

What did you learn from this experience both personally and professionally?  (consider your clinical experience, community experience, cultural experience, communications and interactions with faculty, staff, peers, and patient population)

Personally, I have learned that I can be open to different cultures and accept it. It has taught me to broaden my thoughts sphere. Professionally, I have learned a lot in clinical medicine, how to build a rapport with my patients, how to take samples and to do procedures. I have also learned that it is important to treat all your colleagues, be it any position they hold, in the right manner. Professional camaraderie can go a long way in building the right atmosphere at your workplace. The community at large has taught me that one should always be mindful of others around oneself.

How did you feel when you returned to your home school?

Anjali Anna Thomas completed a GEMx Elective in Internal Medicine at Ben-Gurion University (Israel)

It was a fantastic experience. I felt that a lot of things that I had seen back at Israel could also be adopted at my home institution.

How is this learning relevant to you now that you are back? Can you give any examples?Will you do anything differently now?

The Infectious Medicine Department in Soroka Medical Center had a strong measures and protocols for the management of infectious diseases in the campus and I felt that such measures could be introduced in my home institution.

(more…)

GEMx Sponsored Competition: International Contest of Medical Knowledge (CICoM) 2017

Filed under: GEMx Sponsored Events, GEMx Student Reflections

Post by Joel Sebastian Arellano, Medical Student at National Autonomous University of Mexico (Mexico City), and CICoM Coordination General

International Contest of Medical Knowledge

The International Contest of Medical Knowledge is an initiative launched back in 2013 by students from the Faculty of Medicine of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, an event for undergraduate medical students all around the world, that through a healthy/fair competition and cultural activities they get to exchange experiences in practice and knowledge on the general medicine field.

It began after the University sent six of its students to a competition in Universidad del Rosario, Colombia; they were inspired on how the contest awoke their hunger for knowledge and were very impressed with the hospitality shown by the organizers. These six students decided they wanted to create an event that would not only allow the participants to boost medical education, but also establish bonds between entire cultures and individual contestants. After an entire year of planning, the organizing committee managed to crystalize their dream: the first CICoM taking place in November 2014, with the participation of 14 Mexican universities and 2 Colombian Universities. Encouraged by the achievements of that year, the students in charge of the event began outlining of CICoM 2015. They were able to contact GEMx and since that year onward,

GEMx at CICoM
 GEMx has proved to be invaluable support for the event, as sponsors and allowing CICoM to grow with their international network.

undergraduate medical students from around the world

Since then, CICoM has become a valuable and innovative tool in medical education and has welcomed universities such as Fundación Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud (Colombia), Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana (Colombia), Universidad de Manizales (Colombia), Universidad del Rosario (Colombia), Universidad de Chile (Chile), University of Sharjah (United Arab Emirates), University Medical Center Groningen (Holland), Kasturba Medial College (India), Universidad de Murcia (Spain), Obafemi Alowo University Ile-Ife (Nigeria).

This year, CICoM 2017 will take place at Faculty of Medicine of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México on November 15th-17th, a perfect opportunity to broaden your medical knowledge, learn about Mexican culture, and meet the future leaders of medicine from all over the world.  Besides the competition, activities such as workshops on anatomy, histology, surgery, and medical scenario simulation will be imparted. Also a tradition in CICoM, a medical fair with different organizations and medical publishing houses will be carried out simultaneous to the contest.

symphony

Do not let the chance of participating in this event go by! Seize this opportunity to expand your horizons and create memories you will cherish forever! Register now by sending an email to inscripcionescicom@gmail.com . For more information log to http://www.cicomedic.com/ . You can also visit us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CICOM-1398951420369933/?fref=ts .