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A Regional Exchange at the University of Malawi College of Medicine

Filed under: GEMx Regional Exchanges GEMx Student Reflections

a smiling student

Post by John Baptist Ssenyondwa
GEMx exchange student from Makerere University School of Medicine 

John standing outside of the Queen Elizabeth Hostipal

My first day at Queen Elizabeth
Hospital

Medical school without a clinical rotation outside the teaching hospital environment of one’s training is not comprehensive enough. Through elective rotations, medics are exposed to the different experiences that come with working in a different setting from one’s training facility. I was one of the students that got the opportunity to take part in the GEMx Electives program this year. It was last semester for me and not only was I looking forward to completing medical school but also engaging in a clinical rotation for the weary holiday prior to internship. I had tried to apply for several programs that I could enroll in before I started internship but in all in vain.

As I walked through the busy schedules of school, the call for applications by GEMx Electives came to my notice and so came the interest to apply to take part. I had always wanted to travel as a student to a different medical school for an exchange program that would contribute to building my future career as a doctor. I immediately logged into my new GEMx account to find out the available universities for elective applications. I also found out that I was under the GEMx- South to South program which included University of Witwatersrand in South Africa;  College Medicine in Malawi, Makerere University and University of Rwanda. The days passed by and three weeks later on, I received the good news that my application had been accepted for the elective rotation at Malawi University College of Medicine. Filled with joy, I shared my good news with friends who were happy for me.

Malawi is divided into the central, northern and southern regions with 28 districts. The college of medicine is located in Blantyre, which is found in the southern region of Malawi. Having been established in 1992, it is the only medical school in the country with four undergraduate courses offered which include the five-year-long Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery (MBBS), and the four-year-long programs of Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Sciences (BMLS), Bachelor of Physiotherapy (Hon) and Bachelor of Pharmacy (Hon). For a greater portion most of my rotation, the College was on holiday and therefore I had appropriate contact time with the senior lecturers however limited interaction with the other students.

surgery being performed

Assisting surgical theater at Mercy James Centre for Paediatric Surgery and Intensive Care

The first official day of my elective found me at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in the Surgical Annex for the handover meeting held daily. Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital is the largest government tertiary unit and main teaching hospital for the College of Medicine. The hospital handles the referrals from the districts surrounding Blantyre. I was oriented through the facility ends and corners so that I could get my bearings well thereafter. I was introduced to the head of department, Surgery and each individual on the team I was joining in paediatric surgery. I rotated through paediatric surgery for first three weeks and one week at Beit Cure International Hospital.

Cure Malawi is a 58 bed teaching specialized in treating orthopedic needs of children and adults opened in 2002. The hospital also has special expertise in total hip and knee replacement surgery, making it one of the few places where this surgery is available in Sub-Saharan Africa. The hospital treats a wide range of orthopedic conditions including clubfoot, burn contractures, osteomyelitis, and other acquired or congenital conditions. In addition, CURE Malawi also provides physiotherapy and chiropractic services.

Table of Metrics

Table I. The cases observed and assisted in Paediatric Surgery rotation at the MJC theatre

 

Table of Metrics

Table II. The different surgeries participated in at Beit Cure International Hospital

While at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, I attended the handover meeting first before heading out for the day’s work each day. At these sessions, a 24 hour recap of the cases handled by the department was held and these cases discussed by the resident doctors together with the respective surgical teams of General Surgery, paediatric and orthopedic surgery.

Ward rounds were conducted daily by a senior consultant and residents on the different wards. The wards included: Paediatric Surgical Ward at the Mercy James Center; Chatinkha Neonatal Unit; Paediatric Nursery Ward; Paediatric Oncology Ward.  At the ward rounds, I was able to see several of the common conditions in paediatric surgery most of which I hadn’t seen during my school rotation. Additionally, we were able to discuss the conditions with the consultants and learn the approach to managing the ailments.

While in paediatric surgery, I was able to attend 3 ward rounds in a week. At the ward rounds, I was able to see several of the common conditions in paediatric surgery most of which I hadn’t seen during my school rotation. Additionally, we were able to discuss the conditions with the consultants and learn the approach to managing the ailments.

The OPD [Out Patient Department] ran every Monday afternoon after the rounds. While at the clinic I participated in eliciting history from the patients, examining and discussing with the consultants the different cases. This was a special learning experience as we saw several patients with a variety of conditions and therefore I always had various conditions to study. I had assignments to do every clinic and this facilitated my learning throughout the rotation. It was exciting to be in theatre and take part in the management of patients. I worked in theatre on Tuesday till Thursday for about seven hours each day.

surgery being performed

Assisting through the operations at Beit Cure Hospital

The rotation at Cure hospital was one week during which I rotated through the OPD clinic, theater and the wards. The OPD clinic also ran on Monday the entire day. I attended one clinic day of which we saw 30 patients with various orthopedic conditions. I was well facilitated by Dr. Lubega Nicholas, an orthopedic surgeon at cure who always discussed and ensured I followed through the activities at the facility.

I also attended teaching seminars at Cure hospital with the resident orthopedic students. Much as the cases discussed at these seminars were beyond my scope, I was able to learn the basic concepts on how to diagnose and know who to refer to. I learned the basic surgical skills employed generally in the field of surgery. I also took part in the general surgical management of the patients admitted at Cure, assisting in the various operations at the facility.

natural waterfall and pools

At Dziwe Lankhalamba Waterfall

While in Blantyre, I toured several beautiful places around the town during the weekends which also rejuvenated me throughout the rotation. I hiked Mulanje Mountain the highest peak in Malawi and visited several other sites like Mandala historical site among others. I met so many people and made quite a number of friends both within the medical field and other fields.

During my stay in Blantyre, I was able to work in a different environment with warm people eager and committed to improving the health of their patients. Despite the fact that the setting was much similar to my training hospital, I was able to achieve the objectives of my rotation.

I was able to develop and build my confidence in proper approach to pediatric surgical cases. My diagnostic acumen depending on history taking from the patients without need to depend on newer imaging diagnostic modalities was greatly improved. I was trained by highly qualified surgeons in the basic surgical skills and technique employed in the operation theatre which is a lifelong skill obtained.

group of young people

With new friends

The rotation greatly supplemented my prior curricular clinical rotation in which some concepts and topics had been unsatisfactorily taught. I was able to deeply appreciate and understand some of the topics clearly through the ward round discussions with my supervisors and mentors. Throughout the rotation, I had ample time to read up the cases I saw on the ward and in theater. I was also able to identify the deficiencies associated with our African health systems and how these impact on the health of our patients. I met different individuals practicing in the medical field and made friends throughout my rotation and stay in Blantyre. It was great interacting and socializing with people from all over the world but with similar goals and interests. I was able to share several ideas and experiences with my new friends and establish career building relationships.

 

GEMx Elective Reflections: Exchange From Makerere University College Of Health Sciences To Kenyatta University School Of Health Sciences

Filed under: GEMx Regional Exchanges GEMx Student Reflections

Post by Wasukira Bugosera Sulaiman, Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery student at Makerere University CHS (Uganda), who went on a GEMx regional exchange to Kenyatta University School Of Health Sciences (Kenya)

GEMx student at medical camp

Medical camp at Huruma Children’s home

The first clinical year at Makerere University College of Health Sciences is always climaxed by doing a clinical placement in a field that a student is interested in and done from places of their own choice. Well, this was my opportune moment to hunt and grab a site and an opportunity to do my placement in a very resourceful fun and skill- impacting environment for one month (4th July – 4th August).

In just the same time, a rare and perhaps a first time opportunity presented itself in which a call for students interested in undertaking exchange electives through the GEMx exchange system was put up.

Application and Vetting

Another selfie of exchange students
Having been an ambitious highly motivated and open-minded medical student ever looking around for opportunities and trying out on each of them, I went ahead to initiate the application for the GEMx elective exchanges through the GEMx web based system. Application was through the international office and was consequently followed by an interview, which I presume to have just excelled in and followed by being successfully nominated to undertake an exchange elective at Kenyatta University School of Health Sciences, through the GEMx- MEPI partnership. This was with two other classmates: Namingira Simon Peter and Barigye Aston.

The rest of the process involved obtaining a couple of documents as required by the host University. I was amazed by the way the GEMx web system eased the whole process of document submission and with the fact that I could actually store these documents for another application in the future. At the end of the whole process, all documents were submitted through the web system! By this moment, I just had to hold on for the host institution to review and accept my application which came in through on the 9th June 2017.

Preparations before travel

GEMx exchange students in front of a monument
Just as the Luganda saying goes “Okutambula kulaba, Okudda kunyumya” literally meaning that “to travel is to experience and returning home is to tell stories”, the preparations were quite filled with a lot of expectations and excitement; new experience, a lot to learn, first time in Nairobi and so much more. As all preparations were under way, I am sincerely grateful the support given to us (me and the other two colleagues) both from the home institution (Ms. Phiona Ashaba and Dr. Isaac Ssinabulya) and Host institution (Dr. Kahiga Titus and Mr. Vincent) plus the GEMx staff (Ms. Faith Nawagi). As a team, they ensured that the funds to facilitate our electives were processed in time, bookings for accommodation made, bus station pickups arranged, plus guiding on what we need to carry for daily living in Nairobi. At this moment, the GEMx checklist was important since it acted as a measure of the progress in the preparation process. The GEMx web system also played a big role in the preparation process as it provided the emergency contacts from both the host and home institution. This greatly eased communication towards and during our travel.

Travel to Nairobi

Selfie of exchange students
Right after securing our fund facilitation for electives, we booked the bus to Nairobi on the eve of our travel with travel date of 3rd  July 2017, and opting for the 7am bus because we wanted to experience the epic scenery as we go sight-seeing the way to Nairobi as long as no one interrupted my peace in my window seat.

Our journey was a fine one with a lot scenery along the way and with most of the attention after crossing the border. The stops in Kisumu and Nakuru, made the journey was less tiresome and awesome.

I should say my eyes are wiseacres as they immediately identify and report to me the good and unique things they see. The same thing happened upon entry in Nairobi, it was the beaming street lights and the skyscrapers that welcomed me then I knew this is the capital of the famous Kenyatta land!!!  The great hospitality we received made me feel like actually we sometimes have 2 hearts- one that pumps blood and the other one for caring. Our arrival time in Nairobi was 9:30 pm and we were picked up by Mr. Vincent, one of the administrative staff members at Kenyatta University. Off we went to Kahawa-Wendani, where our accommodation had been booked in a Destiny Park Hostel, a student hostel approximately 500metres from Kenyatta University.

Stay in Nairobi, Kenyatta University and the elective site

Student with faculty supervisor

With our supervisor Dr. David Galgallo

HABARI!!!! Our Kenyan life begun with a visit to Kenyatta University where we were given a tour around the university by a medical Student (Kiema Lucky) and later on met the GEMx coordinator, Dr. Kahiga, Mr. Vincent and Dr. Francesca Ogencha. The three were to be in charge of our stay in Kenyatta University.

The lecturers strike and Nurses strike.

I thought we had left the habit of lecturers’, non-teaching staffs’ and other government workers’ strikes in Uganda. But little did we know that this would be our big welcome in Kenya. By the time period we arrived at Kenyatta University for our electives, the lecturers in all public universities had gone on strike and so was the case with the nurses in Kiambu hospital, which is the teaching hospital for Kenyatta university school of Health Sciences.

These happenings put our rotation on the clinics and wards on a halt for a full week as the staff at Kenyatta University tirelessly worked around to get us a nearby hospital to undertake our elective at. By the second week, Dr. Francesca had managed to secure us a place at the Mater Misericordiae Hospital, where I and Barigye Aston were to do Pediatrics and Child Health and our colleague Namingira Simon Peter was to do Obstetrics and gynecology. The group in pediatrics and child health were to be supervised by Dr. David Duro Galgallo and the colleague in Obstetrics and gynecology was to be supervised by Dr. Irungo.

The Mater Hospital: The clinical experience

Mater Misericordiae hospital is a catholic founded missionary hospital, a multispecialty hospital with many branches worldwide, and the Nairobi branch being one of them. Located in Nairobi South B, having our clinical rotations in Mater Hospital meant that we had to travel an approximate distance of 20km to reach hospital from our residence in Kahawa, which is north of Nairobi city. A tiring but rather good opportunity for me and my colleagues to learn how to go around Nairobi by ourselves.

At the Mater Hospital, we were given a great hospitality with all the staff mindful to teach us whatever they could.

Outpatient clinics

Exchange student with hospital staff

At the OPD clinic

The outpatient clinics in The Mater hospital are conducted by consultant pediatricians and during the clinics, I was involved in clerking the patients to take history and also do clinical examination under the guidance of the attending consultant for the clinic. This was followed by forming a diagnosis and a management plan. Subsequently, we discussed the patient’s condition with the consultant and participated in patient education about their conditions including informing them about what the diagnosis is, helping them form decisions about treatment course of action and preventive measures for recurrence of certain conditions.

The outpatient clinics are mainly for follow up and review of review of patients who were discharged from the inpatient care.

At the outpatient clinic, patients who had symptoms that pointed to a diagnosis for which a patient needed inpatient care were admitted on the pediatric ward.

At the outpatient clinic, I also participated in the immunization of children and the consultant taught me about the recommended immunization schedule as per the ministry of health in Kenya.

Pediatric ward (Lourdel Ward) and Special Care Unit

Student poses with the admin staff at Kenyatta University

At the OPD clinic With administrative staff at Kenyatta University

On the pediatric ward and the special care unit, I was involved in clerking the patients to obtain history and also did clinical examination then later presented the patients to the consultants. After the patient presentations, we were engaged in the patient condition discussion and later patient education. I also participated in the request for the required patient investigations and follow up on the patients’ progress on the wards. The whole process was incorporated with bedside teachings about the common conditions experienced on the ward.

Obstetrics theatre

During the caesarean section theatre sessions, I would occasionally attend with the pediatrician and participated in receiving the babies.

Postnatal ward

In the postnatal ward, we participated in review of the wellbeing of the newborn babies who were always kept at the hospital for up to a maximum of 4 days. During this period, all those who developed any complications like hemolytic disease of the newborn and neonatal sepsis, were isolated and taken to general nursery or special care unit for the necessary care to be given.

Continuing Medical Education (CME) Sessions

The Mater hospital holds continuous medical education sessions for its clinical staff, aimed at updating the clinical staff members about the latest advances in management and care of patients with certain disease conditions.

During my electives period at Mater hospital, I attended CMEs about management of Asthma, Ateriovenous malformations and Cholera. During these sessions I learnt in detail about the etiology, epidemiology, pathophysiology and management options of the above conditions

Nairobi city and Culture

GEMx Student in traditional African attire

Trying out the Masai attire

Learning on job has never been among my hobbies but as it’s said “a drowning man even holds on a straw to survive”, I was made to reproduce the spoonful Kiswahili that I had learnt ages ago as I needed to get along with some “rafiki” and also navigate my way through the city. However, this in most times never worked and my thick accented English made in Uganda had to come and bail me out. But save for the fact that I did not know a lot of Kiswahili which is the national language in Kenya, the rest of the cultural experiences were just amazing and since most of the ward round and clinic activities ended by lunch time, we used to utilize most of our afternoons to explore the beauty of the city of Nairobi and trying out the local delicacies.  Tours to the Uhuru Park, Central park, Kenyatta International Convention Centre and many more other places enabled us view Nairobi from a variety of angles.

Most notable are the Matatus and the matatu culture. Matatus is the commonest public means of transport within Nairobi and the design plus the music in the matatus made using them to move around Nairobi a thrilling experience.

Kenyatta University: Involvement in student activities and Interaction with student community

While at Kenyatta University, even when we did not get chance to rotate on the wards with other clinical students due to the ongoing strikes, we were able to get time to meet with them in other activities. Important to mention is the Medical camp at Huruma Children’s home, which was organized by Kenyatta University Pharmacy Students Association (KUPhSA), where I was able to meet with many Kenyatta University medical students plus students from University of Science Philadelphia who were also visiting students to the Kenyatta University School of Health Sciences. During the camp, I was paired with a pharmacy student at the consulting desk, an experience which gave me a new touch of the importance of involving pharmacists in the day to day patient care. 

Group of students together after dinner

At Dr. Kahiga’s home with students from Kenyatta University and University of Science Philadelphia

As we were coming to the end of our electives, we were privileged to be hosted by Dr. Kahiga Titus for a luncheon at his home in Kitengela-Kajiado. Here I was able to meet a lot more students from Kenyatta University, meet the Students from Philadelphia again and still meet many officials from the Kenya Pharmacy and Poisons Board. This was a moment to grow social and professional circles.

Lessons learnt

As the medical discipline is known to be a monkey see monkey do business, for the knowledge we can read and acquire but skills have to be passed on through apprenticeship. With a very good mentor assigned to me as my supervisor, my rotation in Pediatrics and Child health at The Mater Hospital made the love for the discipline glow more and more. Being in Mater Hospital, a state of art hospital, I learnt a lot about comprehensive patient care and the practice of medicine in the concept of family care. I also got a deeper understanding of the importance of team practice in patient care. These two aspects of which I believe will enable me grow into a better healthcare provider. With the disease patterns slightly differing in Nairobi as compared to Kampala, I was able to experience child health in a new environment and learn of management of common childhood diseases in Kenya as compared to Uganda. This enabled widen my scope of thinking as a clinical student which is an important aspect in patient care. This coupled with the many differences in health policies made me better appreciate some of the concepts of global health.

Future commitments

The name may be called GEMx exchanges but personally I customized it as GAME CHANGER for the experience, knowledge and skills acquired. I can undoubtedly say it has been a cornerstone in my medical education and I believe it has already shaped my path as a future health worker. Talent may be everywhere but opportunity isn’t, thus I am committed to pass on information about GEMx exchanges to other students within and outside my university so as they may be able to gain the same experience or even better.

 

 

A Conversation Between Dr. Elsie Kiguli-Malwadde and Faith Nawagi

Filed under: GEMx Regional Exchanges

Faith Nawagi, GEMx Africa Regional Representative, recently spent time with Dr. Elsie Kiguli-Malwadde to discuss her work as a physician, faculty member, and medical educator, as well her work with the AFREHealth interdisciplinary health professional forum in Africa.  GEMx has been working in partnership with AFREHealth to pilot a network of regional exchanges among existing network partners in Africa. To read more about these Regional Exchanges in Africa please visit http://www.gemxelectives.org/regional-partners-africa/.

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Part 2:

Part 3:

Part 4:

GEMx Elective Reflections – GEMx African Regional Exchange Experience

Filed under: GEMx Regional Exchanges GEMx Student Reflections

Post by Kennedy Omondi Ogutu, BScN Student at Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (KENYA) in 2nd week of GEMx elective at University of Zimbabwe (ZIMBABWE)

PRE-DEPARTURE

GEMx student steps off plan for exchange

Indeed, I lack words to express my sincere gratitudes to the GEMx committee represented by Carol Noel Russo, the host coordinator at the University of Zimbabwe, Mrs. Hope Chuma Vunganayi and my school GEMx coordinator at Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Dr.Monicah Karara.

It is my pleasure to thank you all for your commitment and determination made to ensure my elective at University of Zimbabwe attached at Parirenyatwa Group of Hospitals become a success.

As a medical student, it was always my dream to participate in an exchange program outside my country in order for me to learn and gain skills on how healthcare systems workout in other countries.It was with much joy and happiness when I received an email congratulating me for being elected to participate in GEMx elective at the University of Zimbabwe (MEPI), to me the medical elective was a golden opportunity which only comes once in a lifetime. I was prepared both psychologically and physically to participate in the elective and make it a success.

ACCOMODATION AND ORIENTATION ACCOMODATION.

GEMx Student in housing accomodations

The day I arrived at Harare International Airport, I was received warmly, I felt at home. Later on, I was taken to the place of residence within the University. Indeed it is a well-furnished guest house meant for visitors who come for elective at the University of Zimbabwe. The house is conducive for learning activities and well secured. Indeed it is nice and comfortable.

CULTURE

The main languages spoken in Zimbabwe is Shona and English. I found it quite a challenge adapting the language because most of the places, the commonly used language is Shona. This led to some communication barriers at times but I was able to cope through the interpreters.

ORIENTATION TO PARIRENYATWA HOSPITAL.

My 2nd day in Zimbabwe, I was taken to Parirenyatwa Hospital located near University of Zimbabwe, College of Health Sciences.  It is the largest referral hospital in Zimbabwe, with well-equipped facilities and personnel. I was privileged to be oriented by one of the students at Parirenyatwa School of Nursing. It was a very nice learning exposure while at the hospital. I got the opportunity of visiting almost all the departments in Parirenyatwa Hospital despite the largeness of the hospital. Among the departments I visited were the paediatrics ward, surgical ward, medical ward, the oncology ward, the Intensive Care Unit, the labour and delivery ward, the accident and emergency department among the very many departments in it.

CLINICAL ROTATION AT THE LABOUR AND DELIVERY WARD.

Based on the elective that I chose, majorly dealing with obstetrics and gynaecology, I was attached to the labour and delivery ward for a two week experience

I report to the labour and delivery ward at 7am, where reports from the nightshift duty staff is given to the staff starting of the duty. The reports on the patient was given inform of case presentation.It was a very nice learning session to me during the ward rounds and giving off the patients report. Ward rounds were conducted with the presence of the Obstetrics consultants, the midwives, interns and the students. Different aspects on different patients were discussed based on their condition. The staff were able to teach us the very many obstetrics emergencies and complications and their management. Being a referral hospital, I was able to witness most of the complications related to labour and delivery and their management. Among the complications I came across was post-partum haemorrhage, breech presentation, retained placenta among many others emergencies and complications.

View of Parirenyatwa Hospital

View of Parirenyatwa Hospital

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS OBTAINED

For the duration less than 2 weeks that I was attached to the department, I have been able to meet my objectives in the labour and delivery ward.  Among the very many objectives set and which have been achieved include; the assessment of a pregnant woman, prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV/AIDS, management of women with post-partum haemorrhage, eclampsia etc, management of babies with special needs, performing and suturing of an episiotomy, administration of medication used during labour and delivery. Finally, was conducting labour and delivery.

IT IS AN AMAZING EXPERIENCE.

LESSONS LEARNT

GEMx exchange student in hospital
GEMx Exchange Student in front of university sign
I believe in improving and prolonging the lives of human beings through a holistic approach of healthcare services to humanity. It feels good when a patient who was critically ill, bed-ridden and was not be able to do activities of daily living, gets well as a result of good health care service offered to them. I learnt that medical practice is similar globally, and it needs teamwork, sharing of knowledge and empathy to patients in order to ensure holistic approach of care to patients.

From the deeper recess of my heart,/ express my sincere gratitude to GEMx for giving me this wonderful “golden opportunity”

 

GOD BLESS

 

 

A message from GEMx Regional Representative in Africa – Faith Nawagi

Filed under: From GEMx Staff GEMx Regional Exchanges

Post by Faith Nawagi, GEMx Regional Representative 


Faith Nawagi, GEMx Regional Representative

It all began in 2014 when I attended The Network TUFH conference in Fortaleza Brazil. I met Ms. Anna Iacone who was really passionate about global exposure for medical students. Having been volunteering at my school back then at the international office  I thought this would be a great opportunity for our school but also bearing in mind that i had strong interest in internationalization in health professional training. My roles at the international  office back home were really too basic These involved helping with orienting exchange students and faculty by taking them around the hospital and adapting to the life around Uganda by showing them places that would enable them get their basic needs. In 2015 I was lucky to be one of the winners of the student Projects for Health which was sponsored by GEMx in Gauteng South Africa under the Network TUFH. While there, I met the entire GEMx team and we discussed more on possible roles and ways to enhance visibility in Africa for GEMx.

Faith Nawagi, GEMx Africa representative
In 2016, GEMx launched the regional exchange program in Africa to enhance global exposure for students as they train to become future health practioners. In the same year I took up a role as the GEMx Africa representative where i played an imperative role to bring on board 24 African medical institutions to provide elective programs for medical and other health professional students. This was through working with the various networks that are existent in the region. These include, MEPI, COECSA, NEPI and EAHPHEA. With the various associations meetings were held with the board and GEMx representation for interested schools to sign up was through an Exhibition booth, abstract pre
sentation and modulation of conference sessions. Late in 2016 we worked on ensuring all schools submit the required documents.  The electives are to be up and running this year 2017. As the project is implemented various aspects of research and strengthening partnerships will also be looked at.  In addition I also serve as the Co-chair on the Student Ambassador Network for GEMx new brooding consortia of students for the various GEMx schools with great potential to enhance GEMx visibility yet at the same time promoting cross cultural linkages and global learning opportunities and interaction.

GEMx has offered the best platform for me to realize the kind of career path I always wanted through contributing to medical education in research, academia and building global partnerships. My greatest glimmer is the hope GEMx has provided to medical and other health professional students across the globe to gain global exposure through building global partnerships but also at the same time enhancing visibility of the outstanding community projects with significant impact implemented by students across the world.